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Conferences - GLGDW 2006

The scoop on the 2006 Great Lakes Great Database Workshop.


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GLGDW 2006

Best Practices for Class Design - Speaker: Marcia Akins

The theme for GLGDW 2006 is "Best Practices". But what are best practices? The definition of "Best Practices" must include the fact that they are based upon experience and not merely theory. Marcia has had over 20 years of experience in the software industry and has written extensively on class design and implementation. This session distills her accumulated experience and knowledge to save you from having to go through he paint hat she has in order to acquire it.

The first thing is to recognize when you need to create a class. The key questions here are
. What is a class?
. Why do I need one?
. How should I go about creating one?

An additional issue is how to go about re-factoring your existing classes in order to improve their usefulness and maintainability. There is no right answer to any software problem. The reason for using best practices is to avoid making the kinds of rookie mistakes that will compromise your design in the future. Among the best practices covered in this session are:
. Assigning responsibilities correctly
. Avoiding tight coupling
. Minimizing the placement of functionality too high in the class hierarchy
. When to use composition and aggregation
. When to augment and when to specialize

If you have ever designed a class and gotten it wrong, this is a session for you.

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